Tag Archives: Executive Search

The Value of Engaging A Boutique Executive Search Firm

When most people think of the Executive search industry, they think of the big name firms. These large firms typically cater to the Fortune 500 world. While there is value in working with a big name firm, unless you’re a Fortune 500 company, I don’t feel that you will get the attention that justifies the large fee that you will pay for the service.

Engaging a boutique executive search firm may be the answer because you generally receive a better level of service, expertise, and fee structure. How so?

When you engage a boutique executive search firm, you are dealing directly with the person who will conduct the executive search and also be the one who will reach out, screen, qualify, and submit the candidates for your consideration. At a large executive search firm, the work may be directed by a senior level partner, but a majority of the work is done by lower level employees who are less connected to your company and probably less able to articulate to the candidates what you are looking for in the role.

Boutique executive search firms generally specialize in just a few industries or type of roles. Large firms’ expertise tends to be very broad. Boutique firms tend to know their industries very well and, therefore, have some strong connections with a variety of candidates. Boutiques firms typically work on fewer projects, devoting far more time and attention to each one. Large firms have many ongoing projects and will not be able to devote the necessary time required for tough searches.

Boutiques have higher search completion rates than big firms. Completion rates at big search firms are generally in the 60% to 65% range.

Bigger is not always better in executive search. In many cases, client service suffers by using a large firm. Boutique firms tend to know their clients much better and are interested in building long-term partnership arrangements.


Author
Mike Sweeny
Principal & Founder
MAS Recruiting
www.masrecruiting.com

As a Philadelphia area based Executive Search and Recruiting firm, MAS Recruiting offers clients a strong level of recruiting expertise and an unprecedented level of service not received from larger firms.

We have a national list of clients. Our client list includes emerging growth up to Fortune 500 companies. We have strong recruiting experience in a multitude of industry verticals including:

  • Advanced Materials
  • Business Consulting
  • Clean-Tech & Energy
  • e-Commerce
  • Financial Services
  • Food & Beverage
  • Healthcare
  • Retail
  • Software
  • Technology
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Networking: Still the Best Way to Find Your Next Job

I am asked all the time by candidates , “What is the Best Method for Me to Find My Next Job?” I am a big believer that candidates need to “cast a wide net”. By casting a wide net, I mean use all available resources such as:

  • Reviewing job postings on sites like Indeed, SimplyHired, and LinkedIn
  • Reviewing job postings on various company career sites
  • Posting your resume on jobs boards such as Monster, CareerBuilder, Ladders
  • Contacting various recruiters; especially ones that specialize in your area of expertise

However, the number one best method for someone to find their next job is through networking. Networking should include friends and former colleagues to other connections that you may get from these friends and colleagues. LinkedIn is a great tool to build and grow your network as well as stay in touch.

Networking also greatly improves your odds of finding a new position. For example, once a company advertises an opening, either on their career site or a job board, they are generally swamped with resumes. Under these conditions, it is usually very hard for candidates to stand out.

By networking with a trusted friend or colleague, you may be brought into a search that has just started, or is not advertised, or is a confidential search. The odds of you being considered for the role have now greatly increased because of the small pool of candidates. In addition, since you would be referred by a trusted source to the hiring entity, this is also huge to make you stand out.

Networking is not just something that you do when you begin your job search. Networking should be a constant endeavor. Many times, candidates are brought great opportunities when they are NOT active job seekers It is valuable to always stay connected with friends, former colleagues, and recruiters.


Author
Mike Sweeny
Principal & Founder
MAS Recruiting
www.masrecruiting.com

As a Philadelphia area based Executive Search and Recruiting firm, MAS Recruiting offers clients a strong level of recruiting expertise and an unprecedented level of service not received from larger firms.

We have a national list of clients. Our client list includes emerging growth up to Fortune 500 companies. We have strong recruiting experience in a multitude of industry verticals including:

  • Advanced Materials
  • Business Consulting
  • Clean-Tech & Energy
  • e-Commerce
  • Financial Services
  • Food & Beverage
  • Healthcare
  • Retail
  • Software
  • Technology

Conducting a Job Search-Best Practices

So, you are ready to begin looking for a new job?   Many of the best practices in conducting the search are the same whether you have been forced to undertake the search or have just decided that it is just time to  make a move.  Here are some of my thoughts on best practices:

1.  Update your resume and LinkedIn profile
These steps are the foundation of the job search.  Make sure to take the time to completely and accurately update your resume and LinkedIn profile.   Also, make sure that both the resume and LinkedIn profile contain the same content as companies will, in most cases, review both of them.  It could be an embarrassing situation if one does not agree with the other.  As far as the content, make sure to list your specific accomplishments for each job and be prepared to talk about these accomplishments during any phone or in-person interview.

2.  Tap into Your Existing Network
It is very important to let your network know that you are on the job market.  This network would include former (and maybe current) co-workers or associates, LinkedIn connections, and recruiters that you know.  Many candidates find their next position through networking as opposed to answering a job posting.

3.  Work to Expand Your Network
Letting your current network know that you are on the job market is the easy part.  Expanding the network is tougher.  Asking for referrals from your current network is a good step.  Also, search LinkedIn to locate recruiters who may specialize in placing candidates with your skill set.

4.  Check the Job Boards for Suitable Openings
Check all the major job boards like Indeed. LinkedIn, Monster, CareerBuilder, etc. for any suitable postings.  Apply only to the jobs that you feel that you are strongly qualified.  In today’s very specialized job market, it will be a longshot for a company to consider you for a role if you don’t have direct experience in their respective industry or the specific discipline. Companies are generally looking for candidates who can hit the ground running with very little ramp-up, so candidates who are not ideal fits generally don’t get contacted.

5. Contact Companies Directly
Develop a list of companies in both your local area and specific industry where your skills may be in demand.  Use a tool such a LinkedIn to identify people who may potentially be hiring manager for someone such as you.  Craft a very specific cover letter which highlights your skills and fit and send it (along with your resume) to the potential hiring manager.  Timing could be on your side.  At worst, you should be able to make a valuable contact.

Job hunting is never an easy process and, most likely, will take a longer time that you originally determined.  Hopefully, these practices will be the process a bit smoother.


Author
Mike Sweeny
Principal & Founder
MAS Recruiting
www.masrecruiting.com

As a Philadelphia area based Executive Search and Recruiting firm, MAS Recruiting offers clients a strong level of recruiting expertise and an unprecedented level of service not received from larger firms.

We have a national list of clients. Our client list includes emerging growth up to Fortune 500 companies. We have strong recruiting experience in a multitude of industry verticals including:

  • Advanced Materials
  • Business Consulting
  • Clean-Tech & Energy
  • e-Commerce
  • Financial Services
  • Food & Beverage
  • Healthcare
  • Retail
  • Software
  • Technology

Uneven Job Market

There has been a lot of press regarding the low employment rate in the US (reported by the government as somewhere in the 5% range). Certain sectors of the job market are hot, such as IT positions. However, in many other sectors of the job market, things are pretty tough. Many of the advertised positions are lower-paying jobs. I recently did a somewhat unscientific analysis that proves that this is the case.

I surveyed posted positions on two very popular job posting sites, LinkedIn and Indeed.  Many of you already know that LinkedIn Jobs is a popular, but paid site and Indeed is very popular job posting site and is generally free to post.

I did the analysis using jobs posted within 100 miles of Philadelphia PA (MAS Recruiting’s office location) and then broke the jobs down by salary level. Here is what I found:

LinkedIn
Total Posted Positions in last 90 days: 315,996 as of January 21, 2016

80k+ Jobs: 37, 782 (12.0%)
100k+ Jobs: 15,752 (5.0%)
120k+ Jobs: 7,453 (2.4%)
140k+ Jobs: 3,384 (1.1%)
180k+ Jobs: 1211 (0.3%)
200k+ Jobs: 518 (0.2%)

Indeed
Total Posted Positions in last 90 days: 289,687 as of January 21, 2016

80k+ Jobs: 39,107 (13.5%)
100k+ Jobs: 20,048 (6.9%)
120k+ Jobs: 9,451 (3.2%)
140k+ Jobs: 4,439 (1.6%)
180k+ Jobs: 971 (0.3%)
200k+ Jobs: 359 (0.1%)

The findings are remarkably similar and show that between 75% and 80% of all the posted positions are paying 80k or less in salary.  To me, this shows that company are very careful with their hiring and willing to add lower salary positions to fill some needs, but will not generally hire higher salaried roles unless absolutely necessary.  All of this ties in with what I have seen in my business since Q4 2015.

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Author
Mike Sweeny
Principal & Founder
MAS Recruiting
www.masrecruiting.com

As a Philadelphia area based Executive Search and Recruiting firm, MAS Recruiting offers clients a strong level of recruiting expertise and an unprecedented level of service not received from larger firms.

We have a national list of clients. Our client list includes emerging growth up to Fortune 500 companies. We have strong recruiting experience in a multitude of industry verticals including:

  • Advanced Materials
  • Business Consulting
  • Clean-Tech & Energy
  • e-Commerce
  • Financial Services
  • Food & Beverage
  • Healthcare
  • Retail
  • Software
  • Technology